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Kevin’s big life stories go here!!  [dk, proxy filler below.  not kevins]
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Stephen Curry heard the criticism last week — that his success was due in part to a lack of legitimate perimeter defense in the N.B.A., that today’s stars do not play tough enough to stop him.

To put it bluntly, no defense in history could have stopped Curry at the end of the Golden State Warriors’ game at Oklahoma City on Saturday night.

The score was tied, 118-118, when Golden State’s Andre Iguodala pulled down a rebound off a missed jumper by the Thunder’s Russell Westbrook with about six seconds remaining in overtime. The Warriors could have called a timeout to set up their offense, but Iguodala instead tossed the ball to Curry, who casually made his way across midcourt. Before the Thunder could put together anything resembling a defense against him, Curry launched the ball toward the hoop from more than 32 feet out.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE

N.B.A. Roundup: Warriors Win in Overtime as Stephen Curry Drills 12th 3-Pointer
Stephen Curry Gave Davidson Good Publicity, and a Bad Rap
The Artistry of Stephen Curry
In His Homecoming, Stephen Curry Is King
The Obtuse Triangle
Swish. In addition to beating the rival Thunder, Curry tied the record for the most 3-pointers in a game (12) and broke his own record for most in a season (he has 288 with 24 games to play).

“What was that, 40 feet?” Golden State’s Draymond Green asked reporters after the game. “That’s absurd.”

Continue reading the main story
To put the shot into perspective, consider that the 3-point arc is approximately 23 feet 9 inches from the basket. By launching the ball so quickly, Curry took the shot well before Andre Roberson, a stout defender for the Thunder, could get back to defend him.

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Curry finished with 46 points and in his last four games has averaged 43.8 points a game while shooting 61.1 percent from 3-point range, a rate that was actually better than the 60.8 percent he had shot from the field over all.

For the season, Curry is leading the N.B.A. in scoring at 30.7 points a game, and he appears to be a lock to be the eighth player in N.B.A. history to complete a so-called 50-40-90 season — shooting 50 percent or better from the field, 40 percent or better from 3-point range and 90 percent or better from the free-throw line.

The best in the N.B.A. have given Curry, the N.B.A.’s reigning most valuable player, his due:

Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main story
With all the praise has come the expected criticism. Some veterans of previous eras have jabbed at Curry in an apparent attempt to justify how the game was superior when they played.

Oscar Robertson, a Hall of Famer best known for averaging a triple-double for the Cincinnati Royals in the 1961-62 season, seems intent on writing off Curry’s success as a product of bad defense rather than superior marksmanship.

“When I played years ago, if you shot a shot outside and hit it, the next time I’m going to be up on top of you,” Robertson said on “Mike & Mike,” an ESPN radio show, on Thursday. “I’m going to pressure you with three-quarters, half-court defense. But now they don’t do that. These coaches do not understand the game of basketball, as far as I’m concerned.”

Many former players rushed to agree with Robertson that Curry’s success was a result of the deficiencies of his era and that their success was somehow more pure.

Surprisingly, one of the most reasonable viewpoints has come from Isiah Thomas, a Hall of Fame guard for the Detroit Pistons who, with a checkered history as a league executive, has often had his credibility questioned.

Thomas supported Robertson’s assertion that a dearth of perimeter defense was a huge flaw in today’s game, but unlike Robertson and many other critics, Thomas acknowledged that Curry could truly be judged only in the context of his era because there is no way to know how his talent would translate to earlier incarnations of the game.

“The game has changed,” Thomas said on “Mike & Mike” on Friday. “You can’t really apply the rules of my era to this one. We have to appreciate what Steph is doing under the rules he’s playing under, and he’s the best player under the circumstances.”

While Coach Steve Kerr has been vocal in defending Curry, poking fun at the former stars who have chosen to criticize him, perhaps the best defense came from Andrew Bogut, Golden State’s lumbering center, who mocked the old-timers on Twitter.

Continue reading the main story
Still, for Curry, who has called the criticism “annoying,” the best response was to take a shot that was indefensible both in the sense that no one should have taken it and in the sense that no one could have stopped it.

When the shot went in, Curry smiled and danced, just like Cam Newton, the star quarterback of Curry’s beloved Carolina Panthers. And like Newton, he did not seem to care if the old-timers found the whole thing off-putting.
———-

Stephen Curry heard the criticism last week — that his success was due in part to a lack of legitimate perimeter defense in the N.B.A., that today’s stars do not play tough enough to stop him.

To put it bluntly, no defense in history could have stopped Curry at the end of the Golden State Warriors’ game at Oklahoma City on Saturday night.

The score was tied, 118-118, when Golden State’s Andre Iguodala pulled down a rebound off a missed jumper by the Thunder’s Russell Westbrook with about six seconds remaining in overtime. The Warriors could have called a timeout to set up their offense, but Iguodala instead tossed the ball to Curry, who casually made his way across midcourt. Before the Thunder could put together anything resembling a defense against him, Curry launched the ball toward the hoop from more than 32 feet out.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE

N.B.A. Roundup: Warriors Win in Overtime as Stephen Curry Drills 12th 3-Pointer
Stephen Curry Gave Davidson Good Publicity, and a Bad Rap
The Artistry of Stephen Curry
In His Homecoming, Stephen Curry Is King
The Obtuse Triangle
Swish. In addition to beating the rival Thunder, Curry tied the record for the most 3-pointers in a game (12) and broke his own record for most in a season (he has 288 with 24 games to play).

“What was that, 40 feet?” Golden State’s Draymond Green asked reporters after the game. “That’s absurd.”

Continue reading the main story
To put the shot into perspective, consider that the 3-point arc is approximately 23 feet 9 inches from the basket. By launching the ball so quickly, Curry took the shot well before Andre Roberson, a stout defender for the Thunder, could get back to defend him.

Diversions
A break from the day’s grimmer news.
Lupita Nyong’o and Trevor Noah, and Their Meaningful Roles
For Some Men, Mark Zuckerberg Is a Lifestyle Guru
‘The Revenant’ Author Michael Punke Has a Day Job
My Kabubble, Starring Tina Fey
Gnome Homes Enchant a Pennsylvania Park, Until They’re Evicted
See More »

Curry finished with 46 points and in his last four games has averaged 43.8 points a game while shooting 61.1 percent from 3-point range, a rate that was actually better than the 60.8 percent he had shot from the field over all.

For the season, Curry is leading the N.B.A. in scoring at 30.7 points a game, and he appears to be a lock to be the eighth player in N.B.A. history to complete a so-called 50-40-90 season — shooting 50 percent or better from the field, 40 percent or better from 3-point range and 90 percent or better from the free-throw line.

The best in the N.B.A. have given Curry, the N.B.A.’s reigning most valuable player, his due:

Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main story
With all the praise has come the expected criticism. Some veterans of previous eras have jabbed at Curry in an apparent attempt to justify how the game was superior when they played.

Oscar Robertson, a Hall of Famer best known for averaging a triple-double for the Cincinnati Royals in the 1961-62 season, seems intent on writing off Curry’s success as a product of bad defense rather than superior marksmanship.

“When I played years ago, if you shot a shot outside and hit it, the next time I’m going to be up on top of you,” Robertson said on “Mike & Mike,” an ESPN radio show, on Thursday. “I’m going to pressure you with three-quarters, half-court defense. But now they don’t do that. These coaches do not understand the game of basketball, as far as I’m concerned.”

Many former players rushed to agree with Robertson that Curry’s success was a result of the deficiencies of his era and that their success was somehow more pure.

Surprisingly, one of the most reasonable viewpoints has come from Isiah Thomas, a Hall of Fame guard for the Detroit Pistons who, with a checkered history as a league executive, has often had his credibility questioned.

Thomas supported Robertson’s assertion that a dearth of perimeter defense was a huge flaw in today’s game, but unlike Robertson and many other critics, Thomas acknowledged that Curry could truly be judged only in the context of his era because there is no way to know how his talent would translate to earlier incarnations of the game.

“The game has changed,” Thomas said on “Mike & Mike” on Friday. “You can’t really apply the rules of my era to this one. We have to appreciate what Steph is doing under the rules he’s playing under, and he’s the best player under the circumstances.”

While Coach Steve Kerr has been vocal in defending Curry, poking fun at the former stars who have chosen to criticize him, perhaps the best defense came from Andrew Bogut, Golden State’s lumbering center, who mocked the old-timers on Twitter.

Continue reading the main story
Still, for Curry, who has called the criticism “annoying,” the best response was to take a shot that was indefensible both in the sense that no one should have taken it and in the sense that no one could have stopped it.

When the shot went in, Curry smiled and danced, just like Cam Newton, the star quarterback of Curry’s beloved Carolina Panthers. And like Newton, he did not seem to care if the old-timers found the whole thing off-putting.
———

Stephen Curry heard the criticism last week — that his success was due in part to a lack of legitimate perimeter defense in the N.B.A., that today’s stars do not play tough enough to stop him.

To put it bluntly, no defense in history could have stopped Curry at the end of the Golden State Warriors’ game at Oklahoma City on Saturday night.

The score was tied, 118-118, when Golden State’s Andre Iguodala pulled down a rebound off a missed jumper by the Thunder’s Russell Westbrook with about six seconds remaining in overtime. The Warriors could have called a timeout to set up their offense, but Iguodala instead tossed the ball to Curry, who casually made his way across midcourt. Before the Thunder could put together anything resembling a defense against him, Curry launched the ball toward the hoop from more than 32 feet out.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE

N.B.A. Roundup: Warriors Win in Overtime as Stephen Curry Drills 12th 3-Pointer
Stephen Curry Gave Davidson Good Publicity, and a Bad Rap
The Artistry of Stephen Curry
In His Homecoming, Stephen Curry Is King
The Obtuse Triangle
Swish. In addition to beating the rival Thunder, Curry tied the record for the most 3-pointers in a game (12) and broke his own record for most in a season (he has 288 with 24 games to play).

“What was that, 40 feet?” Golden State’s Draymond Green asked reporters after the game. “That’s absurd.”

Continue reading the main story
To put the shot into perspective, consider that the 3-point arc is approximately 23 feet 9 inches from the basket. By launching the ball so quickly, Curry took the shot well before Andre Roberson, a stout defender for the Thunder, could get back to defend him.

Diversions
A break from the day’s grimmer news.
Lupita Nyong’o and Trevor Noah, and Their Meaningful Roles
For Some Men, Mark Zuckerberg Is a Lifestyle Guru
‘The Revenant’ Author Michael Punke Has a Day Job
My Kabubble, Starring Tina Fey
Gnome Homes Enchant a Pennsylvania Park, Until They’re Evicted
See More »

Curry finished with 46 points and in his last four games has averaged 43.8 points a game while shooting 61.1 percent from 3-point range, a rate that was actually better than the 60.8 percent he had shot from the field over all.

For the season, Curry is leading the N.B.A. in scoring at 30.7 points a game, and he appears to be a lock to be the eighth player in N.B.A. history to complete a so-called 50-40-90 season — shooting 50 percent or better from the field, 40 percent or better from 3-point range and 90 percent or better from the free-throw line.

The best in the N.B.A. have given Curry, the N.B.A.’s reigning most valuable player, his due:

Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main story
With all the praise has come the expected criticism. Some veterans of previous eras have jabbed at Curry in an apparent attempt to justify how the game was superior when they played.

Oscar Robertson, a Hall of Famer best known for averaging a triple-double for the Cincinnati Royals in the 1961-62 season, seems intent on writing off Curry’s success as a product of bad defense rather than superior marksmanship.

“When I played years ago, if you shot a shot outside and hit it, the next time I’m going to be up on top of you,” Robertson said on “Mike & Mike,” an ESPN radio show, on Thursday. “I’m going to pressure you with three-quarters, half-court defense. But now they don’t do that. These coaches do not understand the game of basketball, as far as I’m concerned.”

Many former players rushed to agree with Robertson that Curry’s success was a result of the deficiencies of his era and that their success was somehow more pure.

Surprisingly, one of the most reasonable viewpoints has come from Isiah Thomas, a Hall of Fame guard for the Detroit Pistons who, with a checkered history as a league executive, has often had his credibility questioned.

Thomas supported Robertson’s assertion that a dearth of perimeter defense was a huge flaw in today’s game, but unlike Robertson and many other critics, Thomas acknowledged that Curry could truly be judged only in the context of his era because there is no way to know how his talent would translate to earlier incarnations of the game.

“The game has changed,” Thomas said on “Mike & Mike” on Friday. “You can’t really apply the rules of my era to this one. We have to appreciate what Steph is doing under the rules he’s playing under, and he’s the best player under the circumstances.”

While Coach Steve Kerr has been vocal in defending Curry, poking fun at the former stars who have chosen to criticize him, perhaps the best defense came from Andrew Bogut, Golden State’s lumbering center, who mocked the old-timers on Twitter.

Continue reading the main story
Still, for Curry, who has called the criticism “annoying,” the best response was to take a shot that was indefensible both in the sense that no one should have taken it and in the sense that no one could have stopped it.

When the shot went in, Curry smiled and danced, just like Cam Newton, the star quarterback of Curry’s beloved Carolina Panthers. And like Newton, he did not seem to care if the old-timers found the whole thing off-putting.

Kevin Hester
Kevin Hester is currently living on Rakino Island, a small island in the Hauraki Gulf near Auckland New Zealand, monitoring the unravelling of the biosphere and planning Professor Guy McPherson’s November 2016 NZ and Australian speaking tour which is a follow up to the 2014 speaking tour. The Island has no grid tied electricity or reticulated water. I catch my own water from the roof and generate my electricity from the ample solar radiation on the island.
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